From the Blog

What is Gum Disease?

What is gum disease

Gum disease is a serious oral health condition that can affect both your teeth and gums. The term “gum disease” is used to describe a variety of diseases that affect the gums and supporting tissues of the teeth. It is caused by the build-up of plaque and tartar on your teeth, and if left untreated, can lead to tooth loss and other serious health problems. In this blog post, we will discuss the definition of gum disease, the different types of gum disease, and how it can affect your oral health. We will also discuss two forms of gum disease that can occur in patients with dental implants: peri mucositis and peri-implantitis.

So, what is gum disease? Gum disease is an infection of the gums that can lead to tooth loss and other serious health problems. The main cause of gum disease is the build-up of plaque and tartar on your teeth. Plaque is a sticky film of bacteria that forms on your teeth, and tartar is a hard deposit of plaque that has hardened on your teeth. It takes approximately 24-72 hours for dental plaque to harden into tartar. Plaque can be removed with regular brushing and flossing, however tartar can only be removed by a dentist using special tools. If plaque and tartar are not removed with regular dental care, they can irritate and inflame the gums, causing gum disease.

Gum disease is classified into six different types: gingivitis, periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, chronic periodontitis, systemic periodontitis, and necrotizing periodontal disease.

Gingivitis

Gingivitis is the early stage of gum disease and is marked by red, swollen, and bleeding gums. Gingivitis is caused by plaque and tartar build-up on your teeth. Many people with gingivitis don’t even know they have it, especially since it does not usually cause any pain or discomfort. Nevertheless, if you notice symptoms of gingivitis, it is important to see a dentist so that they can remove the plaque and tartar from your teeth. Regular dental exams every six months also allow your dentist to diagnose gingivitis in its early stages when it is very treatable. If gingivitis is left untreated, however, it can progress to periodontitis.

Periodontitis

Periodontitis is a more serious form of gum disease that can lead to tooth loss. Periodontitis occurs when the plaque and tartar on your teeth continue to irritate and inflame the gums. In addition to symptoms of gingivitis, this inflammation causes the gums to pull away from the teeth, creating pockets where bacteria can grow. As the disease progresses, the bones and connective tissues that support your teeth are destroyed. If periodontitis is left untreated, it will cause the supporting structures to deteriorate and can eventually lead to tooth loss.

Aggressive Periodontitis

Aggressive periodontitis is a more severe form of periodontitis that progresses more quickly than other forms of the disease. Like periodontitis, it is marked by inflammation and destruction of the gums, bones, and connective tissues that support your teeth. However, the rate of destruction is faster in those with aggressive periodontitis. If aggressive periodontitis is left untreated, it can quickly lead to tooth loss.

Chronic Periodontitis

Chronic periodontitis is the most common form of periodontitis. It is marked by gum recession and the development of periodontal pockets. Both gum recession and periodontal pockets promote inflammation and destruction of the gums, bones, and connective tissues that support your teeth. If chronic periodontitis is left untreated, it can lead to tooth loss. The main difference with chronic periodontitis is that the destruction occurs at a slower rate, which makes it easier to control with treatment.

Systemic Periodontitis

Systemic periodontitis is a form of periodontitis that was triggered by a systemic disease. Systemic diseases are diseases that affect the whole body, such as diabetes, HIV/AIDS, respiratory, and heart disease. Systemic periodontitis can cause gum recession and bone loss. If systemic periodontitis is left untreated, it can lead to tooth loss.

Necrotizing Periodontal Disease

Necrotizing periodontal disease is a rare and severe form of gum disease that is marked by the death of the gums, bones, and connective tissues that support your teeth. If necrotizing periodontal disease is left untreated, it can quickly lead to the death of living tissue and tooth loss. This form of gum disease is more likely to occur in individuals with systemic conditions such as malnutrition, HIV/AIDS, and immunosuppressant conditions.

In addition to periodontal diseases that affect the teeth and gums, there are also peri-implant diseases which can affect the success of a dental implant, as well as the health of the gums. These two peri implant diseases include:

Peri-mucositis

Peri-mucositis is a form of gum disease that can occur in patients with dental implants. It is marked by inflammation and soreness around the implant site. If peri-mucositis is left untreated, it can lead to peri-implantitis.

Peri-implantitis

Peri-implantitis is a form of gum disease that can occur in patients with dental implants. It is marked by inflammation and destruction of the tissue around the implant site. If peri-implantitis is left untreated, it can lead to implant failure.

In Conclusion

In this blog, we discussed gum disease. We started out by discussing the basic definition of gum disease and what “periodontal” means. Then we listed and described the six types of periodontal disease: gingivitis, periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, chronic periodontitis, systemic periodontitis, and necrotizing periodontal disease. We also mentioned two forms of gum disease that can affect individuals with dental implants: peri-mucositis and peri-implantitis. If you think you may have any form of gum disease, it is important to see a dentist as soon as possible for treatment. Gum disease is a serious condition that can lead to tooth loss, so it is important to get treatment as soon as possible.

Share:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest

Like this post? Read more related articles!

More from the Chestnut Dental Blog!

Learn more from our blog and education library.